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Posted by: Doug Henwood | May 24, 2018

Fresh audio product

Just added to my radio archive (click on date for link):

May 24, 2018 Richard Walker, author of Pictures of a Gone City, on what the tech boom has done to the Bay Area

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Posted by: Doug Henwood | May 17, 2018

Fresh audio product

Just added to my radio archive (click on date for link):

May 17, 2018 Carol Graham (papers here, here, and here) on failing health and declining prospects among poor white people • Kristen Ghodsee, co-author of this article, on the vile uses of anti-communism

Posted by: Doug Henwood | May 10, 2018

Fresh audio product

Just added to my radio archive (click on date for link):

May 10, 2018 Christy Thornton on AMLO and Mexico’s July elections • Richard Florida on the spatial dimensions of inequality

Posted by: Doug Henwood | May 8, 2018

Fresh audio product

Just posted to my radio archive (with a few days’ delay—sorry!). Click on date for link:

May 3, 2018 Alejandro Velasco on Venezuela • Jessica Blatt, author of Race and the Making of American Political Science, on the racist origins of the discipline

Posted by: Doug Henwood | April 27, 2018

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Just added to my radio archive (click on date for link):

April 26, 2018 Corey Pein, author of Live Work Work Work Die, on the dark side of the Silicon Valley • an anonymous sex worker on the legal dangers of SESTA/FOSTA

Posted by: Doug Henwood | April 19, 2018

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Just added to my radio archive (click on date for link):

April 19, 2018 Kate Doyle Griffiths on teachers’ strikes and the crisis in social reproduction • Thea Riofrancos and Daniel Denvir on Yascha Mounck and liberal derangement syndrome

Posted by: Doug Henwood | April 6, 2018

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Just added to my radio archive (click on date for link):

April 5, 2018 Sean Jacobs, founder of Africa Is A Country, on Winnie Mandela’s legacy • Forrest Hylton on Colombian politics in the run-up to May’s presidential election

Posted by: Doug Henwood | March 29, 2018

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Just added to my radio archive (click on date for link):

March 29, 2018 Sean Guillory, host of the Sean’s Russia Blog Podcast, on Putin and Russophobia • Alex Vitale, author of The End of Policing, on school shootings and what (not) to do about them (and why it’s bad to label school shooters as terrorists)

Posted by: Doug Henwood | March 23, 2018

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Just added to my radio archive (click on date for link):

March 22, 2018 Jennifer Berkshire, host of Have You Heard?, on teachers’ strikes, WV and beyond • Stan Collender on fiscal follies in DC

Posted by: Doug Henwood | March 17, 2018

The wit and wisdom of Larry Kudlow

News that Larry Kudlow will become Trump’s top economic advisor reminded me of my experience with him when we were Left vs. Right guests on a WNYC-TV show in the early 1990s. WNYC’s studios were then in the Municipal Building in lower Manhattan. A producer met us in the lobby to take us upstairs, and proudly noted that the building had just been renovated. Larry’s response: “They should have just let it fall down.”

In an effort to democratize the form, WNYC had placed remote cameras in a few dwellings around the city, so citizens could ask questions and make comments to the guests. Larry had unsurprisingly spent much of the show mourning the passing of Reaganomics and prescribing it as the cure for all our ills. One of the remote questioners was a black man in East New York (a Brooklyn neighborhood that was then and still is one of the poorest in the city). He told Larry that they didn’t see any of that Reagan magic in his neighborhood. Larry dismissed his testimony, saying “the Reagan years were a Golden Age of black entrepreneurship.”

When it was all over and the cameras were turned off, Larry asked us “Where the hell is East New York?”

Posted by: Doug Henwood | March 15, 2018

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Just added to my radio archive (click on date for link):

March 15, 2018 John Clarke of the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty on what’s wrong with a Universal Basic Income • Isabel Hilton on Xi Jinping’s becoming China’s president for life

Posted by: Doug Henwood | March 9, 2018

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March 8, 2018 Jason Wilson on dwindling numbers on the far right • Tim Shorrock on the relations among the two Koreas and the U.S.

Posted by: Doug Henwood | March 3, 2018

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March 1, 2018 Liza Featherstone, author of Divining Desire, on the history and meaning of focus groups [disclosure alert: Featherstone is the host’s wife]

Posted by: Doug Henwood | February 23, 2018

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Just added to my radio archive (click on date for link):

February 22, 2018 Marcie Smith, lawyer and adjunct econ professor at John Jay College (CUNY), on the recently departed Gene Sharp, revered but problematic theorist of nonviolence and friend of the intelligence services

Posted by: Doug Henwood | February 19, 2018

Smaller strikes also in decline

Several readers responded to the recent post on strikes by asking if the BLS stats, which cover stoppages involving 1,000 or more workers, are missing smaller-scale actions. (And I should say that I’m being imprecise by calling all stoppages “strikes,” since the figures also include lockouts.) Alas, no.

The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service publishes data on all work stoppages, regardless of the number of workers involved. The numbers from 1984 through 2016 are graphed below.

Smaller strikes peaked at 1,142 in 1985, which looks big by recent standards. If the trajectory is anything like larger strikes, then 1985 was probably a major comedown from the 1950s through the 1970s; the average that year was down 82% from the 1950–1979 average. Even so, 2016’s total of 88 was down 92% from 31 years earlier.

Strikes - smaller

The 2017 data runs only through the third quarter. There were only 39 strikes in the first months of the last year; if you annualize that, you get 52 strikes, 41% fewer than 2016, and 97% fewer than in 1985.

If you look at days of “idleness,” as they say, the decline is even starker: 93% from the 1984 peak (yes, different peak year, and not a typo for “1985”). If you annualize the days of idleness for 2017, you get a 99% decline.

So there’s not much striking going on under the radar either.

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