Fresh audio product

Just added to my radio archive (click on date for link): June 29, 2017 Robert Pollin works out the economics of single-payer in California (paper here) • Michael McCarthy, author of Dismantling Solidarity, on the history of pension funds in the U.S.

Fresh audio product

Just added to my radio archives: August 28, 2014 Naomi Murakawa, author of The First Civil Right, on the underestimated contributions of liberals to mass incarceration • Amy Binder, author of this article, on why Harvard grads flock to Wall Street August 21, 2014 Chase Madar, author of this article, on overpolicing/overcriminalization in the USA • Jeff Smith, author of this article, on Ferguson, St Louis, and political science

Fresh audio product

Sorry for the delay, but three shows freshly posted to my radio archives: January 30, 2014 Laura Newland, author of Chasing Zeroes, on how Wall Street is messing up college life • excerpts from Kshama Sawant’s response to the State of the Union • Tom Philpott on GMOs and ag tech January 23, 2014 Christian Parenti on nature, capital, and the state • Anne Elizabeth Moore on political unrest in Cambodia January 16, 2014 Stephanie Coontz on why men need feminism • Branko Milanovic on the world income distribution (paper here)

Fresh audio product

Just uploaded to my radio archives: March 28, 2013 Terry Kupers on the psychological effects of prison • Haley Sweetland Edwards, author of this article, how Wall Street took over Dodd-Frank March 21, 2013 Yanis Varoufakis on the economies of Australia, Cyprus, and Greece • Jonathan Westin of Fast Food Forward on organizing fast food workers in NYC  

Wall Street (the book) going for almost $1,000

This screenshot just taken on Amazon.com: This is, of course, preposterous. But ego gratifying. And it also means that the four or five copies that were priced around $50 the other week just after the marvelous Justin Fox Review appeared actually sold. But really, how are these things priced? Are their bot-driven algorithms, like on the stock market?

Explaining what goes on in the world: in memory of Bob Fitch

[This is the text of a talk I gave at LaGuardia College, Long Island City, Queens, in memory of Bob Fitch, who died on March 4, 2011, from complications of a fall he suffered when returning home from teaching at LaGuardia. My short remembrance, written for The Nation, is here. Thanks to Jane LaTour for the two photos of Bob reproduced here. Video by Prudence Katze and Will Lehman is here.] I want to start by saying how honored I am to be giving this, the first Bob Fitch memorial lecture. I dearly hope there will… Read More

Face-ripping for fun & profit

[Reading Greg Smith’s open resignation letter to Goldman Sachs in today’s New York Times, which described a systematic fleecing of clients as the institutional norm, reminded me of Frank Partnoy’s 1997 book F.I.A.S.C.O. Here’s my review, from LBO #80. If you like it, subscribe today and make sure it keeps coming.] F.I.A.S.C.O., by Frank Partnoy (New York: W W Norton, 252 pp., $25). It might be best to start a consideration of this revealing book from one of its final pages, where Frank Partnoy explains why he decided to end his brief career as a derivatives salesman at our… Read More

NPR hack apologizes for Wall Street

For a while, I’ve been thinking about writing a piece on how NPR is more toxic than Fox News. Fox preaches to the choir. NPR, though, confuses and misinforms people who might otherwise know better. Its “liberal” reputation makes palatable a deeply orthodox message for a demographic that could be open to a more critical message. The full critique will take some time. But a nice warm-up opportunity has just presented itself: a truly wretched piece of apologetic hackery by Adam Davidson, co-founder of NPR’s Planet Money economics reporting team, that appears… Read More

Fresh audio posted

Freshly posted to my radio archive: June 25, 2011  Abe Sauer, writer for The Awl, on what’s been going on in Wisconsin since the great February upsurge • Abby Rapoport of The Texas Observer on Texas gov Rick Perry • Jon Bakija, co-author of this paper, on how and why the rich have gotten richer June 18, 2011 Ken Morris, co-author of Blind Allegiance to Sarah Palin, on that overexposed curiosity • Julia Ott, author of When Wall Street Met Main Street, on big finance’s attempts to appear democratic

New radio product

Freshly posted to my radio archives: April 16, 2011 Joel Schalit, author of this piece, on Israeli identity and the problems with saying that the country may be turning “fascist” • Michael Heaney, co-author of this paper, on how Obama demobilized the antiwar movement • Roger Lowenstein, author of The End of Wall Street, on the financial crisis and its aftermath

Hard times all around

From a WSJ article on the shrinkage of Wall Street’s bonus pool this year: “Jonathan Beckett, CEO of yacht brokerage firm Burgess, said demand for weekly yacht rentals in the Caribbean this winter is ‘quite poor,’ in part because of Wall Street.” Lamborghini sales are down too, alas.

Radio commentary, April 30, 2010

March on Wall Street The WBAI studios are on Wall Street, of all places, so I was able to catch a glimpse of the anti-bank demonstration sponsored by the AFL-CIO and a coalition of community groups organized by National People’s Action (Showdown in America). It’s inspiring, but I’m afraid there’s just not the level of popular mobilization necessary to overcome the lobbying power of big finance. The unions are blowing off some steam today, but tomorrow they’ll go back to writing big checks to Democratic politicians and apologizing for their failings. And,… Read More

Fresh audio!

Just posted to my Radio archives: April 15, 2010 Robert Scott of the Economic Policy Institute on how China’s currency manipulation kills American jobs • Matt Taibbi on how Wall Street ripped off Jefferson County, Alabama, and the U.S. government Links to relevant bios and articles at archive site.

Me on the CBC

I’m going to be on the CBC’s The Current this morning, discussing the 20th anniversary of Oliver Stone’s Wall Street. Starts at 8:30. Also on Sirius channel 137.

Radio commentary, September 17, 2009

Mixed news on the economic front, as has been the case for weeks going on months. Which is better than what went before, meaning unmixed negatives, but is still a sign of how weak and tentative the economic stabilization has been so far. Thursday morning we learned that first-time claims for unemployment insurance declined last week by 12,000, exending the previous week’s decline of 19,000. But over the last couple of months, the decline that began in March and ran through July, seems to have stalled. And so-called continuing claims, that is… Read More